Toxic Drywall – Not Just From China Anymore

Across the country for the past few months we’ve been hearing about the incidence of toxic drywall installed in homes across the nation causing problems for homeowners. It was alleged that this drywall was possibly responsible for many health problems in residents as well as corrosion in metal surfaces and wiring in many homes.

It has since come to light that many of these allegations are true; the toxic drywall does in fact corrode metal in the home including plumbing and electrical systems. However, officials are unfortunately unwilling to step up and admit that gasses that can corrode your wiring and plumbing can cause a fire hazard or health problems.

Luckily there has at least been some assistance by certain state governments into the problem of insurance agencies terminating contracts with homeowners. For example, in Louisiana the Department of Insurance is mandating that insurance companies are not legally allowed to drop clients due to finding toxic drywall installed in their houses. Many homeowners would like to see the federal government step in to cover the replacement costs of the drywall as well as affected wiring and plumbing; but whether this is likely to happen is anyone’s guess.

While the argument that the government let contaminated Chinese drywall into the country and are thereby responsible for correcting the problems that have arisen as a result seems like a fair assessment, it has recently been discovered that not all of the problems with contaminated drywall are from imported drywall products imported from China.

Apparently, some of the issues with drywall giving off irritating gasses are resultant from homes that have drywall installed in them that was made in the United States. While this discovery doesn’t mean that there isn’t a problem with the quality of drywall that we’re importing into the country, it would seem to imply that there is a bigger issue at hand here, the issue of testing and standards in building products.

While it is easy to just point fingers at whoever you feel is responsible for this problem, whether it be China, the construction companies who built the homes, or the federal government, it is probably more accurate to put the blame on the Consumer Product Safety Commission which has only recently even tested this tainted product and appears to still be shirking any judgement in this issue that will help homeowners get any financial relief for the fiasco that they find themselves in at present.


Post time: 04-13-2017